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USA Presidential Elections

For various reasons such as those expressed on the "USA Welcome" page of this website, as of 2017, the USA continues to be one of the world's most admired countries. It is for these various reasons that, as of 2017, the USA remains a global leader. Yet, despite all of the talk about "American exceptionalism" and "American economic and military might," the reader should not lose sight of the fact that the USA is but one of many countries on Earth. The USA is but one country in the so-called family of nations sharing one atmosphere and one planet Earth.

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A RACE FOR THE WHITE HOUSE

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How to Become President of the United States

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In a representative democracy, it is incumbent upon and is the civic duty of all citizens to get involved. Voting-aged citizens can get involved by going to their polling places and voting on election day. Citizens get to express their public-policy preferences through voting. Political elections only occur several times over the course of the four-year Presidential election cycle. On election day, I do not think that citizens would be sacrificing too much to set aside, say, 30 minutes from their busy schedules to go to their polling place and voting.

In order to vote, USA voting-age citizens must take two crucial steps:

  1. They must register to vote.
  2. They actually must go to their polling places and vote on election day—if not voting by mail.

There is no excuse for not registering to vote. It is far easier to register to vote than it is to, say, complete a school form, apply for a credit card, apply for a job, apply for a bank account, apply for an automobile loan, apply to rent an apartment, and so forth. In other words, if you can complete the department of motor vehicles' form to obtain a photo ID, then you can find the time to go vote.

Equally, there is no excuse for not voting. It takes far less time to vote than it takes to, say, go to school, go to work, go to the movies, go to the mall, go to the grocery store, go to the bakery, go to the gas station, go to a restaurant, and so forth. In other words, if you can find the time to wait in line to purchase some fast food or if you can find the time to wait in line to use the ATM machine, then you can find the time to go vote.

Who Votes? Congressional Elections and the American Electorate: 1978-2014

NOVEMBER 2012 USA PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION: REGISTRATION AND VOTING
November 2012 Total Population all ages  
USA Population 314,877,116  
 
November 2012 Total Population 18 years and over  
USA Residents 235,248,000  
 
November 2012 Total "Citizen" Population 18 years and over  
USA Citizens 215,081,000  
 
November 2012 Reported registered Reported not registered No response to registration Total "Citizen" Population 18 years and over
Registration Numbers 153,157,000 33,134,000 28,790,000 215,081,000
Registration Percentages 71.2% 15.4% 13.4% 100.0%
 
November 2012 Reported voted Reported did not vote No response to voting Total "Citizen" Population 18 years and over
Voting Numbers 132,948,000 54,531,000 27,601,000 215,080,000
Voting Percentages 61.8% 25.4% 12.8% 100.0%
DATA SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau - Voting and Registration in the Election of November 2012

As of November 2012, according to the USA Census Bureau, the USA's population was estimated to be roughly 314,877,116 residents. Of those 315 million residents, 235,248,000 were 18 years old and older. Of the 235 million residents who were 18 years old and older, 215,081,000 were deemed to be citizens who were eligible to vote. For the November 2012 Presidential election, 71% (or 153,157,000) of voting-age (215,081,000) USA citizens had registered to vote. From those 71% registered voters (153,157,000), 62% (or 132,948,000) of them actually voted in the 2012 Presidential election. To summarize, upward to 61,924,000 voting-age USA citizens did not bother to register to vote. Of the registered voters, upward to 20,209,000 did not bother to vote. One way to interpret the 62% voter participation rate is to surmise that, generally speaking, USA residents are content with the direction the nation is moving and therefore do not feel the need to vote (that is, the glass-half-full perspective). Another way to interpret the 62% voter participation rate is to surmise that a fairly large chunk of USA voters are apathetic or simply do not care about the direction the nation is moving (that is, the glass-half-empty perspective).

To be sure, according to the USA Census Bureau, the following reasons were given by those who did not vote in the 2012 USA Presidential election:

Eligible voters between the ages of 18 and 24 years old are the ones who are least likely to vote; they posted a 38% participation rate in the 2012 Presidential election. Eligible voters between the ages of 65 and 74 are most likely to vote; they posted a 71% participation rate in the 2012 Presidential election. As for an explanation of these differences in voter participation by age, it could be that the younger voters tend to be preoccupied with other curricular and extracurricular pursuits and, therefore, would tend to place a lower priority on voting. On the other hand, older voters might have more leisure time available on hand and do not mind spending some of their leisure time going to their polling place to vote—or do not mind taking the time to vote by mail.

The above November 2012 voting statistics can be viewed at the following web link:

Voting and Registration in the Election of November 2012

Quite possibly, in time, these November 2012 voting statistics will be removed from the Census Bureau's website as these statistics will be replaced by November 2016's election data.

Some additional election and voting resources include the following links:

Register to Vote and Confirm or Change Registration

How to Contact Your Elected Officials

FVAP.gov | Federal Voting Assistance Program

Voting and Elections | USA.gov

Resources for Voters - Voters | US Election Assistance Commission



3 Branches of Government

South Portico entrance of the White House




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REACHING FOR HEAVEN: FUTURE RUMINATIONS

Moving beyond USA Presidential elections and peering deeply into the future, to paraphrase a famous quote, "If you reach for the moon, then you just might end up landing among the stars." Similarly, as humans begin making preparations for 22nd century living, if they keep dreaming and if they keep aiming high enough, then they just might succeed in transforming Earth into some sort of Heaven for the living to enjoy each day.

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